dumbbell lateral raise muscle mas strong

How to do the dumbbell lat raise

The dumbbell lat raise might well be the one exercise most often performed not only incorrectly – but dangerously. Here’s NBP’s Joe Warner on how you can master this shoulder-widening move to build a bigger, stronger and wider upper body!

With the dumbbell lat raise, more than any other free weight exercise you can do, form must come first. But bad exercise execution is preventing so many guys from building the broader set of shoulders they need to achieve a strong and athletic upper body.

If you ask 100 men to do a single dumbbell lateral raise and 99 will perform the move poorly.

The most common error is choosing dumbbells that are far too heavy. The result is that the target muscle, the medial deltoids (better known as the side shoulder muscles), are nowhere near strong enough to lift the dumbbell up, so momentum is required to raise it. With momentum responsible for most the movement, the shoulders barely get worked at all so have no reason to grow bigger, stronger or wider.

How to do dumbbell lat raises for bigger shoulders

Instead of a nice, slow and controlled range of motion to raise the dumbbells up to the sides, then lower them back down, there’s loads of wild, flapping of the arms up and down.

That fails to place any tension on the medial delts (which is what you want if you’d like broader shoulders), but also places a huge amount of damaging stress and strain on the shoulder joints, the most delicate and vulnerable in the human body. And there’s no way you’ll build an impressive upper body if you’re constantly battling shoulder injuries.

We can’t stress this enough: start with lighter dumbbells and master the movement, then gradually increase the weight!

Proper form and muscular maximising time under tension are the two essential elements behind broader shoulders, and going too heavy will stop you getting the result you want.

Here’s how to perform this important shoulder-sculpting move to perfection so you can start to build your best-ever body.

The Dumbbell Lat Raise

Targets: Medial deltoids (side shoulders)
dumbbell lat raise exercise demonstration      dumbbell lat raise exercise demonstration
How to do it
Stand tall or sit on an upright bench holding a light dumbbell in each hand by your side with palms facing your thighs. Raise your chin, keep your chest up, have your back straight and tighten your abs.

Lift the weights up and out to the sides a few centimetres then pause and hold this position for a second to fire up your medial deltoids and switch off your traps (this ensures your side shoulders do all of the work and prevents your stronger traps muscles from taking over).

Maintaining a slight bend in your elbows, now raise the weights up to shoulder height, leading with your elbows (your elbows should be the highest part of your arm, not your hands).

Once the dumbbells are at shoulder height, tilt your wrists to raise your little finger so it’s pointing at the ceiling and hold this position for one second (doing so will fire up your delts even more, recruiting more muscle fibres so you work the muscles harder with every single rep).

Slowly lower the weights back down to your sides under complete control, fighting gravity the whole way. That’s one rep. At the bottom pause before doing the next rep to minimise any bouncing or momentum. This final tip is essential when using the dumbbell lat raise to build the biggest-possible shoulders!

Find your perfect fat-loss plan!
Take the New Body quiz!

How I lost 10kg of fat with my 8-week fat loss plan

The 10 best supplements for men

How to naturally increase testosterone levels

Your top 8 fat loss questions – answered!

3 things I wish I’d known when trying to get lean and lose weight

How to lose your beer belly

3 easy ways to get rid of man boobs

How to get rid of lower back fat

How to get six-pack abs

The best way to get six-pack abs – your questions answered!

New Body Plan uses cookies to improve your experience on our site. For more information see our privacy and cookie policy. Accept Cookies Decline Cookies